The Final Problem – Not Enough to Save Sherlock

holmes_bbcfinalproblemParts of The Final Problem were interesting and the tension was high throughout. But the final confrontation at Musgrave Manor was completely idiotic and ruined the episode. The psychobabble was tolerable to that point. I will say it was the best episode since the season two finale.
I do like that the last image (for me) of the season/series is a plaque reading Rathbone Place, as opposed to having Holmes and Watson running towards the screen ala Baywatch – really?
If there is a season five, at least there will be no more of the worst Moriarty ever filmed. This show really likes to keep dead people on-screen. Might as well be The Living Dead.
You’re going to see posts about how divided the fan base is over Sherlock, and many inaccurate comments that it’s due to purists who can’t take something different. That’s a completely erroneous view. During the first two seasons, Sherlock was almost universally liked by fans and critics alike. Sure, there were a few crusty folks who only want the original stories and Jeremy Brett. And that’s fine. But it was a negligible number.
The stories in seasons one and two were a brilliant updating of Sherlock Holmes. It was clever yet still reverential to the original tales. After that, the storylines (which were sadly lacking in Holmes deducing and solving crimes) catered to new fans and became exercises in Steven Moffat and Mark Gattis showing how clever they could be. And showing how they didn’t need Doyle for their version of Holmes. And that crippled the show, with huge numbers of fans (including me) turning on it.
That divide occurred during season three.
Bill Martell, a Holmes fan with over a dozen produced screenplays, said the following on his FB page:
The genius of S1 & S2 was that they took the Doyle original stories and found the elements that were the same then and now so they were updated without significant changes. S3 & S4 seem to focus on changing what makes the story’s work. Instead of being about the case they focus on the character *at the expense of the case*. So Dying Detective becomes Lying Detective and is all about Watson’s grief over the death of his wife and Holmes’ guilt over his part in that death. That stuff is not just screenwriter invention it goes against the basics of how the original stories worked.
I hope they pack it in. Just as someone wrote over a hundred years ago that old Sherlock Holmes never seemed to be the same after he came back from the Reichenbach Falls, Sherlock wasn’t the same after season two ended. There were pieces of season four that sounded echoes of seasons one and two, but not nearly enough.
And one last thought. “It is what it is” became the catchphrase for the last two episodes. I think there are valid interpretations ‘in episode,’ – meaning, related to the actual stories. But I think it’s also Gattis and Moffat telling Sherlock fans who criticize the show, “This is what we’re doing with Sherlock Holmes and if you don’t like it, tough sh**.” They don’t care that supporters turned into opponents. “Watch it or not. Like it or not. It is what it is. And that’s whatever we want it to be.”
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3 thoughts on “The Final Problem – Not Enough to Save Sherlock

  1. Pingback: Black Gate » Articles » The Public Life of Sherlock Holmes – A New Solar Pons Omnibus

  2. Buddy2Blogger

    Well written post. I think the producers had all along intended the show to be fan fiction. It is the audience who drew their own inferences based on their expectations.

    B2B.

    Reply
  3. Gretchen Altabef

    Thank you, I agree 100% with your well stated article. The Sherlock series started out with high hopes and then the writers, I think, thought they could play with Sherlock Holmes as they did with Dr. Who. Someone needed to tell them that Sherlock Holmes is not a campy character in a campy fantasy series. He is the inventor of modern forensic science, which is why we think he is or was alive. He walked off the page. Conan Doyle was somewhat blind to the fact that he had created a fictional character who actually changed the real world. So brilliant!

    Reply

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